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£4.9 million pounds to train new generation of environmental scientists

Bangor University is poised to train a new generation of environmental scientists equipped to tackle the challenges of a planet under pressure, under a £4.9 million initiative which has been funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Publication date: 6 November 2013

£7m research programme into water, food and energy provision

The first five research projects to be funded through the Welsh Governments’ £7m Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and Environment are announced in Cardiff today (Thursday 26 March).

Publication date: 25 March 2015

Access All Areas at the 2015 Hidden Worlds exhibition

‘Hidden worlds’  the flagship event at Bangor University’s Science Festival, which runs 13-22 March 2015, is offering even more hands on activities and demonstrations in this the Festival’s fifth year.

Publication date: 11 March 2015

A renowned north Wales' Professor has highlighted the importance of Wales’ wetlands as part of World Wetlands Day

Professor Chris Freeman from Bangor University has thrown his support behind the event aimed and at raising the awareness of wetlands across the globe.

Publication date: 31 January 2014

As seen on TV!

A carnivorous plant described in a recent episode of BBC2’s Wonders of the Monsoon can be seen at Treborth Botanic Garden and is thought to be the only one on Wales and one of only a few samples in the UK.

Publication date: 28 October 2014

Autumnwatch viewers to learn about the Sea Trout

Autumnwatch viewers across the UK will learn about a project that’s hoping to improve  the situation for the sewin or sea trout, on the programme to be broadcast on Thursday 18 November (BBC 2 21.30pm 18.11.10).

Publication date: 17 November 2010

Bang Goes the Theory comes to Bangor!

Following the recent furore over horse meat contamination in other meats, BBC’s popular science show, Bang Goes the Theory (on BBC 2 Wales at 18.30on Tuesday 9 April 2013/ Monday 8 April 19..30 BBC One not in regions) looks at how new DNA techniques can be used to identify the fish on your plate.

Publication date: 4 April 2013

Bangor Alumna wins Gold at RHS Show

A BSc Hons Agricultural Botany alumna recently took part in the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show at BBC Gardeners’ World live and won a Gold Medal.

Publication date: 3 July 2015

Bangor at the Ynys Môn National Eisteddfod

As the major provider of Welsh medium higher education, Bangor University is particularly active again in this year’s National Eisteddfod in Anglesey.

Full details and news about the University’s activities at the Eisteddfod is available on the University’s website at: www.bangor.ac.uk/eisteddfod

Publication date: 2 August 2017

Bangor graduates make a difference on World Challenge project

Two Bangor graduates are working on an environmental project in Madagascar, shortlisted for the World Challenge, a global competition aimed at finding projects or small businesses from around the world that have shown enterprise and innovation at a grassroots level.

Publication date: 9 November 2010

Bangor Graduates Take On The Fringe

This summer four Bangor University graduates are taking an original sketch show to the Edinburgh Fringe Comedy Festival!

Publication date: 31 July 2013

Bangor led project covered by Science

A Bangor- Unversity led European Union funded research project developing techniques to assist in the fight against illegal fishing and to preserve fish stocks is covered in the Magazine Science.

Publication date: 17 December 2010

Bangor Professor works with Bear Grylls

A Bangor University Professor provided his expertise for the opening episode of adventurer Bear Grylls’ new three-part TV series, Britain’s Biggest Adventures with Bear Grylls.

Publication date: 16 September 2015

Bangor researchers & students plan to get to the bottom of how new fish species are evolving in a Tanzanian crater lake

Charles Darwin called it the mystery of mysteries: how do new species arise? We understand a lot more now than we did in Darwin’s time, of course. But only with the advent of cheap large-scale DNA sequencing have we had a hope to understand how the process works at the most fundamental level.

Professor George Turner from Bangor University has been awarded a £250k grant from the Leverhulme Trust to study fishes from a tiny lake formed in a volcanic crater in Tanzania.

Publication date: 23 October 2014

Bangor's Biomedical Science Degree Amongst The Best In the UK

The renowned Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) has for the third time in succession announced the award of a further five-year accreditation to Bangor University’s BSc program in Biomedical Science at the University’s School of Biological Sciences.

Publication date: 26 July 2013

Bangor scientists sign letter to humanity

Bangor University scientists are among the 15,364 scientists from 184 countries world-wide who have signed a ‘warning letter’ to humanity about the dire situation that we face.

Publication date: 17 November 2017

Bangor’s elite athletes awarded Sports Scholarships

Every year, Bangor University supports students with sporting ability by offering a number of Sports Scholarships for students studying for a degree in any subject area.

Publication date: 9 December 2016

Bangor’s elite athletes awarded Sports Scholarships

Every year, Bangor University supports students with sporting ability by offering a number of Sports Scholarships for students studying for a degree in any subject area.

Publication date: 10 December 2015

Bangor’s expertise in ‘world-changing’ technology

An area of  research in which Bangor University is a world leader, is described by this month’s (December) issue of Scientific American as one of ten ‘world-changing ideas’.

Publication date: 16 December 2011

Bangor Student Finalists in Climate Week Awards 2013

Andy O’Callaghan, a second year Marine Science/ Zoology student at Bangor University has been names a finalist in the upcoming Climate Week Awards 2013.

Publication date: 4 March 2013

Bangor student graduates with ‘dream degree’

A passionate urban conservationist graduated from Bangor University with his “dream degree” this week. Former Sparsholt College student, Macauly Gatenby, 22, from Portsmouth graduated with a BSc Zoology with Conservation degree after studying at the University’s School of Biological Sciences.

Publication date: 14 July 2016

Bangor University academic invited to international panel on animal by-products disposal

Dr Prysor Williams from the School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography has just returned from an international symposium in Detroit, USA, focussed on discussing all aspects of animal by-product disposal. During the conference, he presented two papers on the research work being undertaken at Bangor University on a novel system of storing livestock carcasses prior to disposal, called Bioreduction.

Publication date: 31 May 2012

Bangor University Alumnus honoured with top geographical prize

The Royal Geographical Society has awarded one of its Royal Medals to a Bangor University Alumnus for his work in agricultural development.

Publication date: 12 May 2017

Bangor University awards three ‘Women in Science’ scholarships

Bangor University has awarded its ‘Women in Science’ scholarships to three outstanding female students: Emily Louise Dunn, Emily O’Regan and Kathryn Howard. All three were undergraduate students at Bangor and graduated with First Class Honours in July 2016. The scholarships, which cover the full course fees, will enable the talented and enthusiastic students to continue their studies and are now enrolled in postgraduate research courses at Bangor.

Publication date: 3 January 2017

Bangor University brings significant European research funding to north Wales

Research funding worth nearing £10 million has been levied by Bangor University researchers from the European Union research funding programme, and the University expects to improve on this results in the new European research and innovation programme.

Forty-two major pan-European research projects led by Bangor University academics were successfully funded, against stiff competition in FP7, the 7th Research Framework Programme of the European Commission, which ran from 2007 to 2013.

Publication date: 10 December 2014

Bangor University graduate presents for the BBC Natural History Unit

Dr Ross Piper, 37, who studied Zoology and Animal Ecology at Bangor University, recently returned from a six week expedition in Burma, during which he was working as a presenter for the BBC Natural History Unit. The three-part series will be broadcast on Friday November 29th on BBC2 at 9pm.

Publication date: 14 November 2013

Bangor University graduate wins Nobel Prize

Bangor University graduate Professor Robert Edwards FRS has been awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Medicine.

Publication date: 4 October 2010

Bangor University hosts its first Polar Symposium

A ‘Polar Symposium’ being held this week-end (Saturday 8 December) is the first of its kind to be held at Bangor University.

The 'Bangor Polar Symposium' at the School of Ocean Sciences has been jointly organized by the UK Polar Network and the Endeavour Society, a Bangor University student society focussing on ocean sciences.

Publication date: 7 December 2012

Bangor University maintains leadership position in Student Satisfaction

Bangor University again leads Welsh universities in the most recent measure of student satisfaction, and is among the top 10 of the UK’s best non-specialist universities, the traditional institutions who offer a broad range of subjects. 

Publication date: 12 August 2015

Bangor University rated Gold

Bangor University has been awarded the Gold standard in the UK Government’s new Teaching Excellence Framework, and is the only University in Wales to achieve this standard.

The framework assesses universities against a range of criteria and is part of the UK government’s plans for raising standards in higher education. It also gives students more information so that they can make the most informed decisions when deciding which university to attend.

Publication date: 22 June 2017

Bangor University Research Excellence Awards 2016

Bangor University is to highlight and celebrate the high standard of research at the University in a new Research Excellence Awards event to be held for the first time this December, and has just announced the Awards Shortlists.

The inaugural Awards will shine a spotlight on some of the University’s outstanding research teams and individuals.

The winners will be announced at an Awards dinner in Pontio on 5th December 2016.

Publication date: 26 October 2016

Bangor University research is set to assist newly protected species

We know that trade and transport of ivory is strictly controlled to safeguard the elephants, and that other animal by-products such as the use of rhino horn is also controlled in an attempt to clamp down on the poaching and illegal trade which affects some of our most threatened species.

The list extends beyond those charismatic species that we’re probably all familiar with.

The organisation responsible for regulating and monitoring trade in wildlife products is the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), to which 183 countries are signatories.

Another group of species, the devil rays, has now joined that list following a recent CITES meeting, and as of today (4 April 2017) the new regulations will be implemented. One Bangor University student is to play a part in the safeguarding of the devil ray and the already protected manta ray.

Publication date: 4 April 2017

Bangor University rewards staff for achieving Research Excellence

A new Research Excellence Awards event has just been held at Bangor University to celebrate the high standard of research at the University.

Publication date: 6 December 2016

Bangor University scientists take part in world-wide ocean health check

Scientists at Bangor University will be joining forces with marine scientists across the world on 21 June to take part in an ambitious global research project – Ocean Sampling Day.

80% of all life on Earth comes from the World Ocean which covers more than 70% of the Earth surface. Marine microorganisms are responsible for a smooth functioning of global elements’ cycles, however less than 1 % of them are known.  The School of Biological Sciences will join 150 research organisations from Iceland to Anatartica and from Moorea (French Polynesia) to South Africa to study and health check the world’s oceans.

Publication date: 18 June 2014

Bangor University seals reputation for wetland science excellence

International award and groundbreaking new course confirms Bangor University as world leader in wetland science.

One of Bangor University's top academics has scooped a major scientific prize the same week as he launches a UK-first course.

Publication date: 16 July 2013

Bangor University’s satisfied students

Bangor University continues to rise in popularity among its students. The University again retains its place at 14th in the UK and is second in Wales in a new university experience survey (Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2016).

Publication date: 17 March 2016

Bangor University’s School of Biological Sciences has again been ranked as the best in Wales by students

The School held on to the top spot following the results of the National Student Survey, a poll of around half a million graduating students from universities across the UK.

Publication date: 19 August 2015

Bangor University students to take part in community tree plant for BBC’s The One Show

Bangor University students will be rolling up their sleeves in front of BBC’s The One Show cameras to help the Maes y Pant community group in Gresford (near Wrexham) to help transform a former quarry into a biodiverse community resource.

Publication date: 16 November 2012

Bangor University subjects join elite in world table

Newly published analysis of the latest influential QS World University Rankings, which saw Bangor University soar to 411th position worldwide, now provides further information on rankings for different subject areas among the world’s best universities.

Six subjects and one subject area taught at Bangor University feature among the world’s elite universities in this year’s release of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, with Agriculture and Forestry appearing in the top 100 institutions worldwide who teach the subject and rising from among last year’s 200 top Universities.

Publication date: 8 March 2017

Bangor University wetland scientists star in BBC show

Wetland scientists from Bangor University have featured in a BBC show on one of Wales’ most important habitats.

 

Two members of the Bangor Wetlands Group at the  School of Biological Sciences appeared on BBC Radio Wales’ popular Science Café series.

Publication date: 30 September 2015

Bangor Welcomes Coleg Cymraeg Posts and Provision

Once again this year, the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol has funded more lecturers to teach in various fields at universities across Wales.

Publication date: 14 September 2015

Be amazed at Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University

Bangor University’s Brambell Natural History Museum, will be open to the public on Saturday, 4th November as part of the Welsh Museums Festival.  The theme of the day is ‘Animals in Welsh Mythology’. Using specimens from the Museum as inspiration, workshops on drawing from specimens to create imaginative collages, prints, narrative and illustrations with be held with artist Jŵls Williams.

Publication date: 1 November 2017

Biological Sciences Alumnus pens best-selling book

A Bangor University alumnus recalls a heart-thumping account of surviving the sinking of a fishing boat in the waters of Antarctica in his best-selling book, Last Man Off.

Publication date: 16 December 2014

Biomedical Science PhD student wins the Carl Singer Foundation Prize

The Carl Singer Foundation, which supports scientific education in the field of yeast genetics, organized for the first time a special presentation session at the recent British Yeast Group meeting.

 

This high profile scientific conference took place between the 7th and 9th of April 2014 at Exeter University. Thirteen students from across the United Kingdom were selected based on the quality of their submitted abstract to present their research work.

 

The winner of the top prize for the best presentation was Mrs Jessica Fletcher from the School of Biological Science at Bangor University. Jessica, who is also a post-graduate teaching assistant in Biomedical Science, researches how a novel variant of the oncogene Chk2 affects the ability of cells to responds to DNA damage.

Publication date: 6 June 2014

Biotechnology for green Pesticides

Bangor University in conjunction with Almac Group and Hockley International have been awarded a grant to develop an organic natural based pesticide. The work will be carried out at the University’s College of Natural Sciences (CNS) and Almac’s laboratories based in Northern Ireland commencing in September.

Publication date: 22 July 2014

Bird-brained? Not at all: Reed Warblers reveal a magnetic map

We all marvel at those mammals, birds and insects who migrate long distances, and at their innate ability to reach a destination thousands of miles away.

Scientists are still trying to unravel all the mechanisms involved. Now, one group of scientists believe that they have revealed one system being used by some migrating birds, and it reveals a fascinating ‘world-map’ that many of us would marvel at.

Publication date: 17 August 2017

Birthday Honours reward Bangor academics

Four individuals connected with Bangor University featured in this year’s Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Publication date: 13 June 2011

Britta gains First in Cancer Biology

A hard working student has graduated with a First Class Honours degree after a memorable three years at Bangor University.

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Cancer Cells do it the “quick-and-dirty way”

The hallmark of cancer is uncontrolled cell growth directed by a cell cycle engine gone into overdrive. The centrepiece of this engine is the enzyme Cdc2 kinase. While Cdc2 kinase is tightly regulated in normal cells, this control is lost in cancer cells.

Cutting-edge research conducted at Bangor University in the North West Cancer Research Institute discovered now that hyperactive Cdc2 kinase not only forces cells into uncontrolled growth but also reprograms the repair of broken chromosomes.

Publication date: 10 June 2014

Cancer Exhibition at the National Eisteddfod Science & Technology Exhibition

As one of the main sponsors of the Eisteddfod Science & Technology Pavilion, Bangor University is taking a lead in getting children and adults involved in the show. The University  has a range of activities at the Exhibition through the week- covering everything from science for the youngest children, with the very popular Fflach Bangor show- to health themes,  including cancer research,  the food we eat and how to check for our ‘vital signs’ as well as revealing a little about how our brains work.

Publication date: 2 August 2013

Can we use eDNA as an ‘environmental magnifying-glass’?

An innovative idea submitted by Bangor University has been selected as one of eight projects selected within four “idea” areas to be funded by the Natural Environment Research Council’s (NERC) new “Highlight Topic” research funding stream.

Based on their research, the scientific community were invited to subject project areas which would place environmental science at the heart of the sustainable management of the planet.

“Environmental DNA: a tool for 21st century ecology”, the new idea suggested by Bangor University in collaboration with other academics and stakeholders, was among around 150 submissions. The successful project will assess how we can use new genetic techniques to measure biodiversity.

Publication date: 2 November 2015

Catfish study reveals importance of being ‘similar but different’

A group of armoured catfishes abundant in small rivers and streams across South America are not all they appear- in fact communities are far more diverse and complex than previously suspected.

A new multidisciplinary study, reported in Nature (6.1.11), has enabled evolutionary biologists at Bangor University to establish for the first time that many Corydoras catfish that live together in the same rivers actually mimic each other’s colour patterns.

Publication date: 6 January 2011

Celebrating Excellence amongst first year students

Award-winning first year students have had their achievements recognized at a prize giving ceremony.

The annual Bangor University Entrance Scholarship Presentation evening saw prizes totalling £138,000 awarded to some of the University’s brightest first year students.

Publication date: 27 November 2014

Celebrating triumph against the odds at House of Lords

A Bangor University student who has received a helping hand from the Helena Kennedy Foundation took part in a special celebration at the House of Lords recently.

Publication date: 3 April 2014

Chris Coleman visits Bangor University to receive Honour

Chis Coleman, Wales’ national football team manager joins Bangor Business School graduating students to receive an Honorary Fellowship, marking Wales’ outstanding achievement at Euro 2016, when the national team reached the semi-finals in an historic and memorable campaign.

Publication date: 17 July 2017

Climate change effect on release of CO2 from peat far greater than assumed

Drought causes peat to release far more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than has previously been realised.

Publication date: 21 November 2011

Climate-changing carbon loss from mangroves preventable - say Bangor scientists

The release of dangerous amounts of greenhouse gases from mangrove swamps could be halted, claim scientists.

A team of researchers, led by Bangor University, say they have the potential to stop climate-changing amounts of gases, such as carbon dioxide, from leaving tropical mangroves if they are damaged or cut-down.

Publication date: 9 June 2016

“Darwin’s puddle” shows how new species can emerge without geographic separation

Cichlid fish from a tiny volcanic crater have been caught in the act of sympatric speciation

Can new species really evolve if there is no physical boundary to drive genetic separation? Physical and genomic evidence from the 700-metre wide volcanic crater Lake Massoko appears to have caught the process in the act.

Publication date: 18 December 2015

David Miller Travel Bursary Award

The David Miller Travel Bursary Award aims to give two young plant scientists or horticulturists the opportunity of overseas travel in connection with their horticultural careers.

Publication date: 4 February 2015

DNA reveals seasonally shifting populations in an iconic Snowdonia lake

An iconic lake at the foot of Mount Snowdon has played a vital role in improving how lakes and rivers can be monitored in the future.

Llyn Padarn, viewed at the foot of Snowdon by thousands of visitors each year, was the testbed for research that could lead to far more efficient and speedy environmental monitoring of our lakes and rivers, following research by Bangor University and others, published in Nature Communications (coi10.1038/ncomms14087).

Publication date: 31 January 2017

Doors open to Bangor University museum collections

Bangor University’s museum collections will be open to the public as a part of the Open Doors events on Saturday 27 September.

The Open Doors event, led by Cadw, gives the public the opportunity to have a look at some of Gwynedd and Conwy’s historical buildings, gardens and interesting and unusual locations all for free throughout September

Publication date: 17 September 2014

Double fish production while preserving biodiversity – can it be done?

Bangor University is involved in new consortium to establish National Aquaculture and Development Centre (NADC) in Tanzania to help tackle poverty and undernutrition. 

Tanzania, perhaps best known for safaris over its vast open plains, has ambitious plans for diminutive freshwater wildlife with enormous, untapped potential.  

Tilapia, second only to carp as the world’s most frequently farmed fish, live in huge numbers in the Great Lakes (Victoria, Tanganyika, Malawi/Nyasa) that cover six percent of the country. The lakes are considered a global biodiversity hotspot – one of only 25 worldwide - due to the hundreds of species of cichlid fish, including some of the 30-odd known subspecies of tilapia that are found in Tanzania.  

However, Tanzanians eat on average only 8kg of fish per year, less than half the international average of 17kg. Around a third of children under five are deficient in iron and vitamin A, contributing to stunting, while about a third of women between 15-49 years old are deficient in iron, vitamin A and iodine. 

Publication date: 11 January 2017

Do you know what’s in your fish fingers? It’s in the genes…

DNA detection tools are revolutionising the way that global fish stocks are being protected and identified.  It is now possible to identify a fish species at any point from the net to a breaded product in the freezer, and these tools are powerful enough to reveal where the fish was caught, or what group of fish it belonged to.

Publication date: 18 July 2016

Envision Doctoral Training Programme Launched

‘Envision’ is a new Doctoral Training Partnership, funded by NERC and led by a highly successful group of UK research institutions, will recruit 60 PhD students (12 per year for the next five years commencing January 2014).

Publication date: 14 January 2014

Expert contributes to UN World Consultation on Aquatic genetic Resources

Professor Gary Carvalho of the University’s School of Biological Sciences was one of 13 world-renowned experts attending a Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations State World Consultation on Aquatic Genetic Resources, at the UN Regional Pacific and Asian FAO Office in Bangkok (28 January-1 February 2013).

Publication date: 5 February 2013

Extinct Elephant Seal population reveals an evolutionary ‘time-machine’

Genetic diversity within isolated populations can occur quite rapidly in evolutionary terms, according to findings of a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B (available online 29.1.14 http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.3078).

Publication date: 29 January 2014

First class degree for Zoology graduate Emilie

Despite facing some criticism about her decision to pursue with her studies, a Bangor University student will be graduating with a first-class degree this week.

Publication date: 24 June 2014

First-class zoology student graduates

An exceptionally active student with a passion for animals graduated from Bangor University this week. Rebecca Snell, 25, from West Kirby, Wirral graduated with a first-class BSc Zoology with Animal Behaviour degree after three years of study at the School of Biological Sciences.

Publication date: 20 July 2017

First count your species- Scientists urge better information before further conservation decisions are made in Australia

Arguments have raged about whether or not dingoes should be culled and how far they are useful in safeguarding threatened smaller fauna, as they prey on the larger cats and foxes.   While the Australian wildlife services are spending thousands on other means of controlling non-native species, without achieving great results, there is evidence that maintaining dingo numbers benefits the smaller mammals.

A paper in the Journal of Applied Ecology (doi: 10.1111/1365-2664.12250 published Friday 10 April) urges all the participants in what has been, at times, a heated debate, to lay down their differences and get back into the field to collate the robust data necessary to provide certainty for management action.

Publication date: 9 April 2014

First in her family to graduate thanks role model mum

Zoology graduate Alexandra Harvey from Stroud, Gloucestershire, has become the first person in her family to graduate from university - and has done so with a First Class Honours degree.

Publication date: 17 July 2015

Fourth Bangor Science Festival is on the horizon

Planning for the fourth annual Bangor Science Festival is well under way and the 2014 Festival is certainly shaping up.  The Science Festival will be held during National Science and Engineering Week from Friday 14th March and Sunday23rd March 2014.

Publication date: 28 January 2014

Gauging evolutionary adaptation- are our models right?

One challenge facing scientists is to estimate how our environment and the complex web of creatures within it, will respond to changes in their environment due to climate change or other human influences.

Traditionally, scientists have taken and tested single or pairs of ecological ‘drivers’ of change in the environment, elements such as increased temperature, increased CO2 or changes in herbicides or fertilizer, to assess how species will evolve over hundreds of generations.

This lab-based model of evolutionary change is simple compared to the complex environment in which species exist, so one major task for scientists is to understand how well simplified versions of environmental change teach us about more complex ones.

Publication date: 1 September 2017

Getting by in Bangor

An increasing number of students are seeking part-time employment during their time at university. Their reason might not be solely to earn money but also to enhance their employability after graduating.

Publication date: 10 March 2015

Globally significant work by Bangor graduate to be put to the test

A new global policy, initiated by a Bangor University graduate will be put to the test for the first time, now that a huge iceberg, estimated to be more than a quarter of the size of Wales, has broken free from Antarctica.

Publication date: 19 July 2017

Growing oil palm for biofuels can’t save our climate

Growing oil palm to make ‘green’ biofuels in the tropics could be accelerating the effects of climate change, say scientists.

Publication date: 31 January 2013

High-Flying Geese take low profile over Himalayas

A study published this week (31 October 2012) in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences has tackled the long-standing problem  of assessing the actual altitude and migration path of Bar-headed geese crossingthe Himalayas using state of the art satellite tracking technology. Scientists from Bangor University and an international team of collaborators recorded highly accurate GPS (Global Positioning System) locations from 42 individual geese as they migrated.

Publication date: 31 October 2012

High flying zoology student graduates

A former Shrewsbury High School Head Girl graduates with a first class degree at Bangor University this week.

Publication date: 10 July 2014

Hitachi-GE, Imperial and Bangor University developing UK and Welsh BWR expertise

Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Hitachi-GE) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Imperial College London and Bangor University, enhancing its commitment to support Welsh and British expertise.

Publication date: 31 October 2016

How does the crab shed its shell?

Anglers everywhere would probably agree that, in season, there’s no better bait than freshly moulted crab. During the moulting season, nothing else works as successfully, as fish are in a frenzy for the ‘delicacy’ of a soft crab. But we’re unlikely to see a crab losing its shell as we walk along our shoreline.

Publication date: 2 June 2015

How noise pollution is changing animal behaviour

This article by Dr Graeme Shannon, Lecturer at the School of Biological Sciences, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 December 2015

How penguins use bubbles to 'take to the air'

A  suggestion by Bangor University Professor Roger Hughes of the School of Biological Sciences, that bubble trails seen in footage of emperor penguins swimming to the sea surface are produced to reduce drag is published in the November 2012 edition of National Geographic. Roger Hughes's intriguing idea while watching penguins on TV originally led to a research paper revealing just how the penguins could manage this. Collaborators at University College Cork and the Technical University of Denmark showed that ‘lubrication’ provided by tiny air bubbles released from under the feathers could allow penguins to gain enough speed to leap out of the water and onto the ice shelf.

Publication date: 22 October 2012

How the snake got its extra-long body

The fairground freakshows of the past are a testament to our fascination with unusual animals. Given the similarities between most furry, four-legged mammals, it’s not surprising that we often look at the more weird and wonderful members of the animal kingdom and ask questions like “Why does a spider have so many legs?” or “Why are snakes so long?”.

Publication date: 9 August 2016

How the snake got its venom

The venom of advanced snakes is a mixture of dozens of different proteins and is an example of an evolutionary innovation – a novel trait that has arisen in a particular animal group and which has contributed to their success. Understanding how these innovations come about is vital to understanding larger patterns of animal evolution and can shed important light on the genetic basis of differences between species, with clear implications for the effectiveness of treatment of victims of bites by venomous snakes, where venom composition varies both within and between species.

Publication date: 11 August 2014

How we're using ancient DNA to solve the mystery of the missing last great auk skins

On a small island off the coast of Iceland, 173 years ago, a sequence of tragic events took place that would lead to the loss of an iconic bird: the great auk.

This article by Jessica Emma Thomas, PhD Researcher, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 10 July 2017

Identifying the mechanisms that affect changes in snake venoms

Every year, snakebites kill up to 90,000 people, mostly in impoverished, rural tropical areas. This statistic is surprising when one considers that antivenoms are available, however, the truth is that the efficacy of antivenom is largely restricted to the snake species that was used in manufacture, and they are often ineffective in treating snakebite by different, even closely related species.

Writing in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United states of America doi.10.1073/pnas. 1405484111) Dr Nicholas Casewell and Wolfgang Wüster of Bangor University  and colleagues identify the mechanisms by which the variations in venom occurs between related snake species and also the significant variations in venom toxicity that occurs as a result.

Publication date: 10 June 2014

Journal edited by Bangor academic ranked #1 in its field

A journal edited by an academic at Bangor University which is an essential resource for all of those interested in the biology, conservation and exploitation of fish has been ranked number one it its field.

Publication date: 3 September 2014

Lab experiments for Ysgol Bodedern pupils participating in Antarctica, Climate Change and Icefish project

Pupils from Ysgol Uwchradd Bodedern working on an innovative and exciting climate change project, visited Bangor University to work in the laboratories there as part of their project Antarctica, Climate Change and Icefish.

Scientists from the University’s School of Biological Sciences have been leading the project under a Partnership Grant from The Royal Society, the UK’s national academy of science, and have been working with the pupils since September. The project is introducing pupils to the effects of climate change on marine animals in a part of the world where biodiversity and habitats are especially vulnerable to environmental change. 

Publication date: 10 December 2012

Landfill sites: not just a load of rubbish

Far from being a load of rubbish, landfill sites should be considered one of the great untapped resources in the search for new enzymes for biotechnology, and could fuel more efficient biofuel production.

A new research paper in mSphere (DOI: 10.1128/mSphere.00300-17) by biologists at Bangor and Liverpool universities has for the first time identified the enzymes which degrade natural materials such as paper and clothing in landfill sites.

Publication date: 22 August 2017

'Life changing' experience for mum

Young mother who left school at 16 says studying at Bangor University has been ‘life changing.’

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Love of nature inspires Malaysian student to study in Wales

A prize-winning student graduated from Bangor University this week.

Publication date: 15 July 2014

Madagascar Evening

Students and staff in the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography are organising a fund-raising evening to support the conservation work of the Malagasy NGO Madagasikara Voakajy (http://www.madagasikara-voakajy.org/) with which the School has a really close relationship.

Publication date: 12 April 2013

Major marine science boost for North Wales

A major £23.6m investment to grow Wales’ growing marine sector by increasing collaborative research projects between business and universities has been announced today (Weds 8th Sept) by Deputy First Minister Ieuan Wyn Jones.

Bangor University’s SEACAMS (Sustainable Expansion of the Applied Coastal and Marine Sectors) project has been given the go-ahead following EU backing of £12.6m from the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Assembly Government. 

Publication date: 8 September 2010

Massive fish fondly followed Kate

A 70 pound grouper, fondly named Darth Vader, took a shine to a Bangor University student over the summer. Kate Cooper, 18, from Pembroke, Bermuda, volunteered at the Bermuda Aquarium during her summer vacation. The massive fish seemed to be very fond of Kate, following her around like a puppy as she cleaned the inside of the glass in the fish tanks

Publication date: 30 October 2012

Measuring success of peatland restoration

Bangor University are assisting the National Trust in an ambitious project to restore Wales’s second largest peat upland and a European-designated special conservation area.

A 400 mile network of ditches on the Migneint between Ffestiniog and Llanrwst will over time be filled in to restore the area to its natural state. Cut over centuries to improve drainage and provide more land for farming and grouse shooting, the ditches are possibly contributing to the release of carbon.

Publication date: 7 February 2011

Megadiverse hotspots under threat from logging

Areas currently facing the highest deforestation rates on our planet, have been identified as having been particularly important in the evolutionary history of the ‘megadiverse’ biodiversity of Southeast Asia.

Publication date: 7 August 2014

Microscopic marine biodiversity mirrors larger life

Distribution of microscopic plants and animals in our oceans mimics the distribution pattern of larger land-based plants and animals, research reveals.

Publication date: 23 September 2014

Migrating birds use a magnetic map to travel long distances

Birds have an impressive ability to navigateThey can fly long distances, to places that they may never have visited before, sometimes returning home after months away.

Though there has been a lot of research in this area, scientists are still trying to understand exactly how they manage to find their intended destinations.

This article was by Richard Holland, Senior Lecturer in Animal Cognition, School of Biological Sciences, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 18 August 2017

Mineralogical Society Distinguished Lecturer

Professor Barrie Johnson has been named as Mineralogical Society Distinguished Lecturer for 2014/15 

Publication date: 17 September 2014

Natural Resources Wales Chief Executive visits 25-year research programme

Dr Emyr Roberts Chief Executive of Natural Resources Wales (NRW) visited Bangor University to present a guest lecture on Natural Resources Wales and opportunities for the integrated management of our natural resources to a gathered audience of students and staff.

Publication date: 12 December 2014

NERC PhD studentship in Zoology

The School of Biological Sciences has a PhD studentship funded by NERC to start in October 2012.

Publication date: 14 March 2012

New DNA Sequencing reveals hidden communities

Half a bucket full of sand from an unassuming beach in Scotland has revealed a far richer and more complex web of microscopic animals living within the tiny ‘ecosystem’ than have previously been identified.

Publication date: 19 October 2010

New extreme micro-organisms found in Siberian soda lake

Professor Peter Golyshin of the School of Biological Sciences, and expert in environmental genomics of microorganisms is the only UK author and participant in research which has discovered a new class of micro-organisms (archaea) that live in the extreme environment of a Siberian alkaline soda lake. What makes this discovery ground-breaking is that these micro-organisms can convert organic material directly into methane under such extreme conditions.

Publication date: 26 May 2017

New means of safeguarding world fish stocks proven

Powerful and versatile new genetic tools that will assist in safeguarding both European fish stocks and European consumers is reported in Nature Communications (DOI 10.1038/ncomms1845 22/05/12). The paper reports on the first system proven to identify populations of fish species to a forensic level of validation.

Publication date: 22 May 2012

New more efficient method of sampling biodiversity showcased in major UK estuaries

Two of the UK’s major estuaries have proved to be a successful testing-ground for an effective new method of ‘health-checking’ aquatic biodiversity, which could lead to faster and more efficient sampling for other sites.

“Bio-monitoring” or assessing the impacts of human activities in the natural environment is often achieved by monitoring biological diversity.  Existing methods rely on manual identification, but that takes time, resources and often focuses on larger creatures, that sometimes may not be able to reflect accurately the health of particular habitats.

Publication date: 9 February 2015

New Research Aims to Revolutionise Pollen Forecasting

A team of researchers are developing a new generation of pollen monitoring which they hope will lead to improved forecasts for thousands of the UK population suffering from summer allergies.

Publication date: 20 October 2015

New species of viper identified

A group of Bangor University scientists have featured in the National Geographic this weekfollowing their discovery of two new species of snake in Southeast Asia.

Publication date: 29 March 2011

New understanding of venom could open door to more effective antivenoms

New research, which disproves the theory that venom evolved just once in reptiles, could also lead to new medical treatments to counteract snakebite.

Publication date: 15 December 2014

One of Nature's Weirdest Events explained

One of the most spectacular migrations on earth; that of the Christmas Island Red Crab is among those included in the January 2 episode of Nature's Weirdest Events on BBC2 Wales at 20.00. Prof Simon Webster of the School of Biological Sciences explains the dramatic mass-migration of Christmas Island Red Crab on the programme. Prof Webster has identified the hormone responsible for this amazing migration. (See related research story here http://www.bangor.ac.uk/news/full-ori.php.en?Id=1381)

Publication date: 2 January 2013

Open Day at Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University with the Herpetological Society

Bangor University’s Natural History collections housed at Brambell Building will be open to the public on Saturday 16th April between 11am and 3pm.

This will be an opportunity to visit the University’s Natural History Museum, which is not usually accessible to the public, to learn more about the animals and plants on display. There will be a chance to ask questions of the available volunteers, and there will be an activities corner for children of all ages.

Publication date: 12 April 2016

Open Day at Brambell Natural History Museum, with drop in drawing sessions

Bangor University’s Natural History collections housed at Brambell Building will be open to the public on Saturday 14thMay between 11am and 3pm.

Publication date: 4 May 2016

PhD Opportunities

PhD candidates are sought for the following projects in the School of Biological Sciences. 

Publication date: 19 October 2017

PhD Studentship in Biomedical Sciences

A Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol PhD Studentship in the Biomedical Sciences is available tenable from October 1st 2012. An aim of the scheme is
to enable academics at the start of their career to qualify as credible applicants for Welsh medium academic posts. The emphasis is on researching
for a PhD qualification, but training in learning and teaching is also an essential part of the scheme.

Publication date: 10 March 2012

Postgraduate Fair Kindle Winner

When George Yates attended the Postgraduate Courses Fair at the end of November, he wasn’t aware that he was about to have to rethink his Christmas list. George’s registration card was randomly picked from over 350 entries on the day of the Fair, and he became the lucky winner of a brand new Amazon Kindle, which coincidently was at the top of his Christmas wish-list when we met up with him in December.

Publication date: 14 January 2014

Prestigious Lecture Award to Prof Johnson

Professor Barrie Johnson of the College of Natural Sciences joins a prestigious list of internationally renowned scientist invited to present the UK Mineralogical Society’s Hallimond Lecture.

Prof Johnson is the only academic from Wales to have presented the lecture in the 46 years since its inception, and was nominated and selected by a panel for the Honour. His lecture will be published in due course in the Society’s Journal.

Publication date: 14 August 2017

Prize Winning Student Graduates

A Bangor University prize-winning student will be celebrating her success during graduation week this week.

Publication date: 12 July 2013

Professor Appointed Chair of International Working Group

Professor Gary Carvalho of Bangor University has been appointed Chair of a working Group for The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES). He is to Chair the Working Group on Application of Genetics in Fisheries and Mariculture (WGAGFM) for 3 years from 1 January 2015.

Publication date: 6 January 2015

Project to scour 'microbial dark-matter' for new biotechnology resources : HORIZON 2020-funded Project ‘INMARE’ begins

In the first award to Bangor University from the major EU Horizon 2020 Program research funding stream, Prof Peter Golyshin will lead an international consortium of more than 20 partners from academia and industry from 12 countries, including leading multinational industrial partners, will work on a four year EUR 6M collaborative project. The project will mine for and use newly discovered microbial enzymes and metabolites, in particular for the targeted production of fine chemicals, environmental clean-up technologies and anti-cancer drugs.

Publication date: 20 April 2015

Rare Conifer first to seed in Wales

A rare Australian conifer, growing in Treborth Botanic Garden, at Bangor University, has set seed for possibly the first time in Wales and only the second time in the UK.

There are only around 100 trees of the Wollemi pine (Wollemia nobilis) growing in its native location in a canyon in Australia. The conifer was only identified in 1994.

Publication date: 20 September 2012

REF 2014: World-leading research in Biological Sciences

The Head of the School of Biological Sciences has welcomed the REF 2014 results, which places the School in the Top 20 in the UK.

Publication date: 18 December 2014

Roller Coaster migratory flights of geese give unique insights into bird physiology and biomechanics at high altitudes

An international team of scientists studying the migratory biology of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus), during their high altitude flights across the Tibetan plateau and Himalayan Mountains, have revealed how these birds cope with flying in the relatively low-density mountain atmosphere.

Publication date: 16 January 2015

Roller-coaster soaring flights of frigatebirds negotiate the doldrums of the tropical Indian Ocean

An international team of scientists, led by Professor Henri Weimerskirch of Chize Centre for Biological Sciences, CNRS in France, with collaboration from Dr. Charles Bishop, Bangor University in the UK, studied the movement ecology of great frigatebirds (Fregata minor). 
Their paper: Frigate birds track atmospheric conditions over months-long trans-oceanic flights, is published in Science today (1st July).

Publication date: 1 July 2016

Running geese give insight into low oxygen tolerance

An international team of scientists, led by Bangor University and funded by the BBSRC, recently tracked the world’s highest flying bird, the bar-headed goose, while it migrated across the Himalayas. Now they have shown how these birds are able to tolerate running at top speed while breathing only 7% oxygen.

Publication date: 8 April 2014

Satisfied students place Bangor University among top UK universities

Bangor University’s students have again given the University a resounding testimonial in the annual National Student Satisfaction survey, placing the University eighth among the UK’s non-specialist universities in the UK and second among Welsh Universities.

The news follows hard on the heels of the University’s recent success in being awarded a Gold Standard in the UK Government’s new Teaching Excellence Framework, the only Welsh university to achieve this standard.

Publication date: 9 August 2017

Scales and Tails

To coincide with Bangor University’s popular Bangor Science Festival, Storiel has launched its latest  foyer display, on the theme reptiles.

The display has been curated by Melissa Green, a zoology student volunteer.

Publication date: 16 March 2017

School of Biological Science Graduation 2017

For all current SBS students graduating this summer, look out for invites to the annual graduation party in Brambell July 20th, tickets available soon.

Publication date: 17 May 2017

Schools benefit from Science Visits

School pupils from Gwynedd and Anglesey took part in exciting experiments, challenges and demonstrations – with some even getting their hands dirty at Henfaes farm - during visits to the University as part of Bangor Science Festival.

Publication date: 12 April 2011

Scientists at work: tackling India's snakebite problem

This article by Anita Malhotra, Senior lecturer in ecology and evolutionary genetics at the School of Biological Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. 

Gerry climbs up to the veranda of our tribal longhouse with a snake bag held out in front of him. “Now don’t get too excited, but I’ve just caught a Kaulbacki,” he says, looking pleased but exhausted from a long hike and a six-metre climb up a tree. We gape, hardly able to believe that we have finally found this rare snake alive after four years of intensive searching.

Kaulback’s pit viper, first discovered in 1938 by British explorer and botanist Ronald Kaulback in northern Burma, is one of the largest pit vipers in Asia. On top of that, according to local reports, its bite is lethal. Despite being a co-author on the most recent paper on the species, I had never before seen a living specimen – few scientists have.

Publication date: 27 July 2015

Scientists from Bangor University win prestigious prize.

A research project, financed by the European Union under the FrameWork7 programme, which involved scientists from Bangor University, has won a prestigious prize.

The ProMine consortium, which included scientists from the School of Biological Sciences (Professor Barrie Johnson, and Drs. Barry Grail, Sabrina Hedrich and Catherine Kay) was funded to generate new products from mineral resources and waste materials found within Europe. As part of this, the Bangor team developed new approaches for recovering metals and synthesizing minerals from waste waters, using novel species of microorganisms.

Publication date: 15 May 2014

Second body clock discovered in the speckled sea louse

Separate timing mechanism presents an exciting new perspective on how organisms define biological time

The diminutive speckled sea louse (Eurydice pulchra) boasts two body clocks, one for night and day and another for the ebb and flow of the tide, according to research published today, Thursday 26 September.

Writing in the journal Current Biology, researchers from Aberystwyth, Bangor, Cambridge and Leicester Universities have confirmed the existence for the first time of a distinct and independent circatidal body clock that follows the 12.4 hour cycle of the tide.

Publication date: 27 September 2013

Solving how a complex disease threatens our iconic oak

Latest scientific methods reveal multi-bacterial cause of stem bleeding in acute oak decline and pioneer novel methods for analysing the causes of complex plant diseases

Team work between Forest Research, Bangor University and others has for the first time, tracked down the cause of the stem bleeding symptoms of this newly identified threat to the native oak.

Publication date: 24 October 2017

Stephanie en route to dream career

A north Wales student who is well on the way on her “dream career” path after securing a temporary role at Chester Zoo graduates from Bangor University this week. Stephanie Davies, 27, from Connah’s Quay, Flintshire studied at the University’s School of Biological Sciences for three years and graduated with a first-class BSc Zoology with Herpetology degree.

Publication date: 17 July 2015

Student Led Teaching Awards 2015

The Student Led Teaching Awards returned bigger than ever for its 4th annual ceremony, along with the much anticipated Course Representative awards

Publication date: 21 May 2015

Study to conserve genetic resources of wild tilapia for the future of fish farming

With world fish stocks dwindling, tilapia farming is a global success story, with production tripling this millennium.

This is now a $7.6bn industry, producing 4.5million tonnes of affordable high-quality fish every year. And it is sustainable, because unlike the salmon and sea bass we grow in Europe, tilapia don’t need to be fed lots of other fish caught from the oceans, but largely eat vegetable material and farmyard waste. Although now cultured throughout the world, tilapia originally come from Africa.

Publication date: 16 March 2015

Supporting the reds!

Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and School of Biological Sciences are working with partners to support the reintroduction of red squirrels to the Ogwen Vally in nearby Bethesda, Gwynedd.

Publication date: 12 June 2017

The African snakebite 'crisis' is nothing new: we’ve been worried about antivenom for decades

This article by Anita Malhotra,  of our School of Biological Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

There is a sound reason why snakes have a reputation for being among the world’s most dangerous animals. In Africa alone, there may be more than1.5m people a year who find themselves on the receiving end of snakebites. Without access to the only effective treatment, antivenom, the death rate can be as high as 20%, with survivors often suffering life-changing disability.

Publication date: 10 September 2015

The Appliance of Science!

Bangor University’s Science Festival is back for its seventh year and welcomes everyone to explore and discuss science through talks hands-on activities exhibitions demonstrations - all free to attend.

Publication date: 16 February 2017

The Appliance of Science!

Bangor University’s Science Festival is back for its seventh year and welcomes everyone to explore and discuss science through talks hands-on activities exhibitions demonstrations - all free to attend.

Publication date: 7 March 2017

The wettest drought on record - the weather of 2012

Come along to Bangor University’s Main Arts Lecture Theatre, on Monday 24th June 2013, at 6.30pm and learn about “the wettest drought on record – the weather of 2012”.

This is a timely Lecture, considering the recent meeting of the UK’s leading meteorologists to discuss recent unusual weather patterns in the UK.

Publication date: 21 June 2013

Three new Bangor academics among Sêr Cymru talent welcomed by Minister

Three new Bangor University academics were among the latest tranche of international research Fellows and Chairs welcomed to Wales at a special reception in Cardiff last night [27 February 2017] to celebrate Sêr Cymru investments and the start of the second phase of the programme.

Publication date: 28 February 2017

Top 10 places Bees love to live

A new scientific report featuring research by Bangor PhD student Laura Jones.

Publication date: 22 February 2017

Two Dragons Garden Project

An exciting new Chinese Garden is to be developed at Treborth Botanic Garden, as part of the wider project at Bangor University.

Publication date: 2 May 2014

Urgent action required to stop irreversible genetic changes to fish stocks

If we are to sustain fish as a global food source, then fisheries and conservation managers need to take account of new evidence showing how overfishing of the larger fish in a population actually changes the gene pool in favour of smaller less fertile fish.

A paper in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment (available online from 18.3.13) led by fish geneticists at Bangor University, with contributions from the University of East Anglia, the University of the West Indies and the Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology, has proved for the first time that the change towards smaller fish takes place at the DNA level, and within a relatively short time period of a few generations.

Publication date: 18 March 2013

Venom Day goes from strength to strength

Bangor University’s Herpetological Society recently held their fourth annual Venom Day. Hosted at the School of Biological Sciences, several experts gave talks about a variety of subjects in the field and delegates had the opportunity to see a live display of venomous reptiles, which included a Cobra, Gila Monster and a variety of vipers. The event is part sponsored by the British Herpetological Society and the International Herpetological Society.

Publication date: 5 December 2014

Venom development revealed by first genome sequencing of King Cobra

Scientists studying snake venom have for the first time sequenced the entire genome of a venomous snake, the King Cobra, and confirmed a previously proposed but poorly documented hypothesis explaining how snake venom is produced and what led to the great complexity of venoms consisting of dozens of individual toxins.

Publication date: 4 December 2013

What prairie dogs tell us about the effects of noise pollution

This article by Dr Graeme Shannon, Lecturer in Zoology at the School of Biological Science was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 14 April 2016

When heat casts a healing spell over cancer

Thomas Turner, a recent Cancer Biology graduate from Bangor University, and Dr Thomas Caspari, a researcher based in the School of Biological Sciences at Bangor University published one of the first comprehensive reviews of  using heat in cancer treatment in Open Biology, the Royal Society's fast, open access journal.

Publication date: 18 March 2014

Why we should bother saving Britain’s only venomous snake

This article by Anita Malhotra, School of Biological Sciences, appears in The Conversation, read the original article.

Publication date: 13 October 2016

Zebrafish and humans have new biomedical friend in the spotted gar

The genome of a slowly evolving fish, the spotted gar, is so much like both zebrafish and humans that it can be used as a bridge species that could open a pathway to important advancements in biomedical research focused on human diseases.

Publication date: 9 March 2016

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